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How to convert sole proprietorship to ApS

Learn how to convert your sole proprietorship to ApS in our blog here. There can be many reasons why you would want to convert your sole proprietorship to ApS. Very often it relates to the wish of having limited liability or tax considerations.

How to convert sole proprietorship to ApS

(This blog was updated last time: 2.4.2021)


How to convert sole proprietorship to ApS

There can be many reasons why you would want to convert your sole proprietorship to ApS.

Very often it relates to the wish of having limited liability.

It is important to first make sure, that you are able to run your company in the limited liability structure.

You can read more about the dangers of operating an ApS if it turns out that you are considered the beneficiary and not the ApS by reading our blog here.

When you want to convert your sole proprietorship to ApS, you have 2 options that are worth considering.



Option 1 – A “tax-free” conversion

When you are in a situation where the company has a significant value, making a “tax-free” conversion often makes very good sense.

The reason for this is:

When the sole proprietorship is converted to ApS, you need to treat it as if the sole proprietorship (machines, equipment, goodwill, liabilities etc.) was sold to the new ApS.

So if the value of the sole proprietorship is high – f.ex. if you have high revenue and many clients – then there would be a profit from selling the company to the ApS.

This profit would come from selling the machines and equipment – and also from selling the clients.

The value of the clients we call “goodwill”.

Also, the goodwill of your clients needs to be determined in order to understand the total profit of “selling” the sole proprietorship to the new ApS.


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Template for calculating the goodwill for a sole proprietorship 37.29 KB 5 downloads

Here you can download a template for calculating the goodwill for a sole proprietorship. ...


To make a tax-free conversion you need an auditor

The auditor will determine the value of the company – including the goodwill – and issue an audited statement relating to the value of the company.

Also, he/she will undertake the actual registration of the ApS.

Once the sole proprietorship is converted to ApS, then you will have a future tax liability calculated from the profit that came from “selling” the company to the ApS – based on the value of the company that the auditor determined.

The fee for the auditor when making a “tax-free” conversion is typically in the range of 5.000 – 20.000 DKK + VAT depending on how complex your company is.


Why is it called “tax free” then?

Well, a more correct expression would actually have been “A tax postponed conversion” – since you still owe the tax from the conversion to the tax office.

But when using the rules for the tax-free conversion, you are allowed to postpone the tax, until the day you sell the shares in the new ApS.

So in reality it is not really “tax-free” – you just get to postpone the tax.


Option 2 – A taxable conversion

When you are in the opposite situation where the company has no or little value, then making a taxable conversion often makes very good sense.

It is because:

Even if you sell your sole proprietorship to the ApS, there is no or little profit as a result of the sale made.

For that same reason, the tax from selling the sole proprietorship to the ApS is also either zero or at least very small.

Compared to the cost for making a tax-free conversion (often 5.000-20.000 DKK + VAT), making a taxable conversion often makes good sense for a small sole proprietorship.


The value of a sole proprietorship

The value of a company is what someone is willing to pay for it.

But since we do not always have a buyer on hand, we have to make some assumptions on the value.

We usually look at the difference between the assets and the liability.

Assets f.ex. consist of

Goodwill
Improvements to leased premises
Machines
Equipment
Deposits
Receivables from customers
Cash and bank deposits
And more.

The liabilities f.ex. consists of

Supplier debts
Loans
VAT debt
Employee tax debt
And more.

Most of these have the value that you can see in the balance sheet.

F.ex. if you owe 1.000 EUR to a supplier, the value of the liability would normally be 1.000 EUR.

Other things, like machines and equipment you will need to estimate the current value on.

Goodwill is very often valued at zero in the balance.

That is because when you started the sole proprietorship, then you did not have any goodwill, to begin with.

So you have been building up an increased value of the goodwill of your clients over the years, that is not shown in the balance as an asset.

Typically the goodwill is the point of interest when making the conversion to ApS for that very reason.


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Template for calculating the goodwill for a sole proprietorship 37.29 KB 5 downloads

Here you can download a template for calculating the goodwill for a sole proprietorship. ...


If the value of the goodwill is zero in the balance, then when converting to an ApS, you will be taxable on the whole value of the goodwill, since the goodwill is considered sold to the new ApS.

In some situations where you have purchased goodwill at some point in the past, we are looking instead at the difference of the existing goodwill in the balance and the current value of the goodwill.

Either way, the value of the current goodwill needs to be determined before converting to ApS.


How do you determine the value of your company?

In order to calculate the value of your company, then, in addition to the machines, equipment, liabilities etc., we also need to calculate the value of the goodwill.

There is no law on how the value of goodwill should be calculated.

And in general, if a company was sold to a person not related to you, then that price would have to be respected.

However, since when converting a sole proprietorship that you own to an ApS that you also own, then you are acting yourself as both the seller and the buyer.

Therefore the price that you decide to sell for has to be documented somehow.

In general, there are 5 methods you can use to document the value of your company:

1: Use an existing tradition for valuation in your industry
2: Use the guidelines made by the tax office to estimate goodwill
3: Use your own way to determine the value of the company
4: Use an offer from a non-related person that wants to buy your company
5: Use a valuation made by a professional


Option 1: Use an existing tradition for valuation in your industry

If you can find existing traditions in your industry that can determine the value of your company including the goodwill, then you can use this form of valuation.

But make sure the tradition is well documented.

Often this is the case for doctors, dentists, law firms, auditors and real estate agents.

But it is by far not all industries that have established traditions for evaluating the value of goodwill.


Option 2: Use the guidelines made by the tax office to estimate goodwill

The tax office has made a set of guideline for calculating an estimated value of goodwill.

So you can use the tax office’s estimate of the goodwill and add that to the other assets and liabilities.

Then you will get a calculated value of your company also.

You can read the tax office’s blog about converting a sole proprietorship to an ApS here

We have also made an Excel sheet you can download and use to calculate the goodwill using the tax office’s guide – please see further below.


Option 3: Use your own way to determine the value of the company

This of course can turn out to be a really bad idea, if your own calculations end up being very different from the industry or the tax office’s guidelines.

Worst case, you will end up having to pay tax on the value of your company that the tax office later would estimate.

To limit the risk, you are able to submit a request to the tax office for them to approve your valuation, prior to making the conversion.

Doing like that will take the uncertainty away.

But it will add a few months to the processing time.

You can apply for a written approval here with the tax office


Option 4: Use an offer from a non-related person that wants to buy your company

If you have a current offer on hand from a non-related person, then you are allowed to use this also to determine the value of your company.


Option 5: Use a valuation made by a professional

You can also get a professional – f.ex. a company broker or auditor – to make a valuation for you.


Calculation of goodwill – using the tax office’s guideline

In order to use the tax office guidelines to calculate the value of goodwill, you need to use the last 3 years of profit for the sole proprietorship in the calculation.

Be aware that there are 2 types of profits

1: A profit that is calculated based on accounting rules

2: A profit that is calculated based on tax rules

As a general rule, you need to use the profit calculated from the accounting rules.

If your company only makes an annual report based on the tax rules (very often happens for smaller sole proprietorships), then you can use the profit calculated based on the tax rules.

The calculation of goodwill is done by taking the profit from the last 3 years before interests and tax (in Danish called “Resultat før renter”).

If the calculation is done in 2021, then we would look at

1: Profit in 2020 before interests and tax
2: Profit in 2019 before interests and tax
3: Profit in 2018 before interests and tax

We then would regulate the profit in each year for specific things

1: We remove salary to a co-working spouse that is not already included as a cost in the profit
2: We remove extraordinary amounts that are not normal (large one-time losses etc.)
3: We remove depreciations done on any previously acquired goodwill

The result you get here we call the regulated profit for each of the 3 years.

Now we need to calculate the average profit of these 3 regulated profits, where the newest year is given more significance than the oldest year.

That is done by multiplying the years with an individual factor and dividing with 6

1: Regulated profit in 2020 x 3
2: Regulated profit in 2019 x 2
3: Regulated profit in 2018 x 1

The sum of this is divided by 6.

This gives us an average profit for a year.

Let us call this amount for the “result” for the purpose of the calculations below.

If the profit has increased every year from 2018 to 2019 and 2020, then we add 50% of the increase in the profit from 2018 to 2020 to the result.

Then we deduct a salary for the sole proprietor that is 50% of the remaining result – however, minimum 250.000 DKK and maximum 1.000.000 DKK.

Then we deduct 3% of the value of the assets (excluding any goodwill purchased in the past) from the remaining result.

For the remaining result, we then need to adjust to future expectations.

It is done by looking at the lifespan expectancy for the clients.

As a general rule, this should be 7 years.

From the below list you pick the factor matching 7 years – which is 2,83:

Client lifespan (years) Factor
1 0,46
2 0,91
3 1,33
4 1,74
5 2,12
6 2,48
7 2,83
8 3,16
9 3,48
10 3,78


If the client lifespan can be set to 7 years (usually this is recommended) then you need to use the factor 2,83 to multiply the remaining result.

This will give you the calculated estimated goodwill.

You can download a template here that can be used to estimate your goodwill:


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Template for calculating the goodwill for a sole proprietorship 37.29 KB 5 downloads

Here you can download a template for calculating the goodwill for a sole proprietorship. ...


What if the goodwill is calculated to zero or even minus?

Regardless of what the calculation shows, you still need to use the actual price for the company, that you would get if sold to someone you are not related to.

So try and consider if the estimated goodwill is realistic.

If you do not feel confident with the value, then ask the tax office:

You can apply for a written approval here by the tax office.


When can you make a “tax free” conversion?

A “tax-free” conversion always goes into effect from the 1st of January in any given year.

You can make the “tax-free” conversion 6 months back in time.

So it means that you can make the “tax-free” conversion between the 1st of January and the 30th of June each year – that will go into effect from the 1st of January the same year (also back in time).